Thinking about becoming a Truck Driver?

CDL Drivers Wanted

This is a good place to start!

There's an awful lot to recommend your consideration of truck driving as a career choice; now and for the foreseeable future. First and foremost, in consideration of the current Driver Shortage, wages are on the increase and the industry is working hard to improve the over-the-road driver's lot on life.

A Few Reasons to Choose Truck Driving as a Career

  • The Industry Needs New Drivers

    The trucking industry is aging and an aging workforce means increased demand for new drivers as others retire. The American Trucking Association estimates a need for 20,000 to 30,000 new drivers every year for many years to come.
  • Improving Economy

    As the economy improves the need to move more goods will increase. The increased demand will lead to higher shipping rates which, in turn, will lead to higher wages.
  • Flexibility

    Because of such high demand for their services truck drivers enjoy a lot of flexibility in their lives, like living where they want and enjoying a wide variety of trucking companies from which to choose.
  • Decent Pay

    When compared to college graduates, especially students who spend 4 years accumulating debt, a good case can be made for choosing a career driving a truck. Here are a couple of interesting items for you to consider. The first one is from a forum discussion at a website I rarely visit: Democratic Underground. It's intersting, though. The second item is published on a really interesting blog entitled DQYDJ.net(Don't Quit Your Day Job).
    1. Comparing Career Paths: Truck Driving Versus A College Degree
    2. Should You Get a Degree or Drive a Truck?
  • Adventure

    It's the reason I got into trucking in the first place. See the country and get paid to do so. I've driven a truck in every state except Hawaii, as well as 6 Canadian Provinces. I've seen and experienced a lot of really interesting things and met even more interesting people. As far as tourist attractions go, however, I've mostly whizzed past their exit off the freeway.

Tips For Truckers

Tips For Truckers

"Never apologize for being great, or wanting to be great, at something"--Kia Nurse

Be Safe

Trucker safety is of the utmost importance. Driving in an unsafe manor risks everything: health, happines, productivity and professionalism. Here's a few suggestions for your consideration:

  • Be careful when backing. Not surprisingly, the number one factor in property damage accidents is backing. G.O.A.L., Get Out And Look, should be your mantra. Also, consider rolling windows down, even in cold weather, whenever you're backing up; use all your senses.
  • Changing lanes is the next most common factor in property damage accidents. One of the reasons to check your mirrors often is to keep track of traffic following or approaching from the rear. Prior to changing lanes be certain you've accounted for all that traffic, signal your intentions and check twice prior to moving. If the reason for your lane change is to pass slower traffic, begin signaling your return to the original lane of travel prior to completing the pass. In this way you'll let following traffic know you're not going to be in their way for long (so they're not as likely to swoop to your right) and it's also less likely the vehicle you're passing will block your return.
  • Slow down prior to entering a corner and then pull the trailer through. Think about it; your tractor likely weighs less than 20,000 lbs. while a loaded trailer will weigh in at as much as 60,000 lbs., or more. If you back out of the throttle in a turn, or as you turn, your trailer's inertia will tend to push, and steer, the rear of your tractor; increasing the possibility of a jackknife.

Be Productive

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Be Professional

I entered a discussion one day with another driver. He refused to consider himself a "professional driver" because driving, in his consideration, is a dirty job; not a profession. Well, it's true, truck driving is classified as an occupation rather than a profession. Wikipedia, though, describes a "Professional" as an individual whose work is, primarily, intellectual rather than physical. Well, it would seem that truck drivers might well span the two distinctions. There are, most certainly, times in the course of a truck driver's day devoted to physical labor and, conversely, times requiring, primarily, intellectual effort.

In an effort to further confuse the situation Merriam-Webster's Simple Definition of Professional is "relating to a job that requires special education, training, or skill". Driving a truck, it would seem, meets every condition of the definition. So a case could easily be made to include truck drivers in a list of professions but there's a little bit more to it, I believe.

During my converstion with the above referenced driver I responded to his negative self-description in the following manner: Upon completion of a particular course of study and after meeting the requirements of an oversight association, such as a state Bar or Board, an individual may join a group generally identified as "Professionals"; like Lawyers, Accountants or Engineers. In other words, they are deemed to be Professionals prior to accomplishing much more than academic achievement. I believe, though, that if I conduct myself in a Professional manner, others might describe me as such. In this way the term "Professional" would be an earned description rather than a bestowed title.

There may be, however, one thing missing. One of the hallmarks of most professions is a code of conduct, code of ethics and set of standards to which members of the profession must adhere. Doctors swear the hippocratic oath. Lawyers, accountants, engineers, airline pilots and many others swear to uphold codes of ethics and conduct. It's a common thread among the generally recognized professions that seems sadly lacking among truck drivers.

Be Healthy

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Be Happy

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